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RSE BBSRC Enterprise Fellowships

RSE Enterprise Fellowships provide a salary, mentoring and formal business training, allowing the Enterprise Fellow to focus solely on developing their business over a 12-month period.

The BBSRC funded RSE Enterprise Fellowship can be taken on a full time or part-time (maximum 2 years) basis; please see the RSE terms and conditions and application guidelines document’s available on the RSE website or contact David Hendry if you would like to discuss.

Collaborate to Drive Agri-Tech Innovation on the Norwich Research Park

With an estimated 9 billion people inhabiting the planet by 2050 and a changing climate putting a strain on current agricultural practices it is now, more than ever, apparent that feeding this rapidly expanding population will require multiple approaches to increasing crop production. Through innovative concepts derived from multiple disciplines this event will demonstrate the new agri-technologies made possible by sharing expertise, platforms and funding opportunities from our academics with agritech companies based on the Norwich Research Park. 

EI Innovate: genomics data to advance bioscience

Developing solutions to global issues with EI’s advanced capabilities and expertise in genomics and bioinformatics - improving global food security, environmental management, conservation, health and wellbeing.

 

Date: 13 November 2019 (one-day event)

Time: 9.30 am – 5 pm

Venue: Earlham Institute

Enquiries: training@earlham.ac.uk

New blood test for prostate cancer is highly-accurate and avoids invasive biopsies

In combination with the current prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, the new test could help men avoid unnecessary and invasive biopsies, over-diagnosis and over-treatment.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western men, with 1.3 million new cases being diagnosed each year worldwide. It is currently detected using a blood test that measures PSA levels. Although it provides early diagnosis, the PSA blood test has a low specificity (high false positives) with about 75 per cent of all PSA positive results ending up with negative biopsies that do not find cancer.